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work with me

I am an author, longtime yoga teacher, breathwork facilitator, and Certified Wellness Practitioner. If you are in any stage of recovery from addiction or mental health challenges, we will work at the intersection of yoga, positive psychology, and modern science so that you heal from the spiritual, mental and physical effects of a chronically overburdened nervous system. 

healing modalities

Conscious, Connected Breathwork is a circular breathing technique that allows you to drop your default thinking patterns so that you have access to a more intuitive and emotionally rich state of mind. You may find that you have access to stuck emotional content and a newfound ability to tend to yourself with compassion and awareness. The intensity of the practice differs for everyone and from session to session, but it is not unusual to have deep emotional release and profound insights in just one session.

Integrative Yoga Sessions are designed to bring you long-term, sustainable growth in your recovery process. Using breath, movement, and yoga psychology, you will find a non-dogmatic approach to recovery from chronic stress and related disorders. The healing you experience with yoga addresses your whole self and integrates your needs for purpose, health, and a balanced nervous system. 

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Conscious, Connected Breathwork

Conscious, connected breathwork is an intentional, powerful method of breathing that can work very quickly to transform your way of seeing and interacting with the world.

 

Without the use of chemicals or plants, this style of breathwork releases you from ego and preconceived ideas about yourself. Once your habitual mental chatter is quieted, deeper aspects of yourself are revealed to you, often leading to emotional breakthroughs and transformational insights.

Breathwork is very useful tool for self-inquiry, intention setting, and processing grief. Breathwork can be done individually, with your partner, or in group settings.

I'd love to talk!
Schedule a free 20-minute intro call.

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Integrative Yoga Sessions
and Wellness Coaching

My work as a wellness practitioner lies at the intersection of yoga, positive psychology, and modern science. ​Our process with begin with self-inquiry that pinpoints your needs and  deepest desires. From there, working together, we will create sustainable shifts that support you long after our work together is done. I value changes that are sustainable, which means change may feel gradual. At the same time, you will learn to use breath and movement to love how you feel in your body right now.​

 

​I take a solutions-oriented approach to well-being that is tailored to your life and circumstances. This work supports your choices regarding other modalities, including western medicine. Part of our what we do together is integrate all of the avenues of support that you find useful. These sessions are perfect if you are in recovery from addiction and other mental health challenges. We will work together using a non-dogmatic approach based on the roots and modern applications of yoga, which address all areas of health and well-being.

  • How are integrative yoga sessions different than coaching or other types of therapy?
    I am a Certified Wellness Provider and have the experience and qualifications for wellness coaching. A lot of what we do together may feel and look like working with a coach. But at the same time, my primary love and the backbone of my recovery is yoga, so I start from there and integrate other modalities when they are helpful. I am not a therapist. My goal is to guide you to discover new ways of experiencing and interacting with the world that lead to greater health in all the domains of your life. The vehicle we will use is yoga, broadly defined as a system of practices that lead to a quieter mind and a life filled with purpose. This is not physical therapy either. Physical therapy uses a targeted approach for a specific area of the body. Yoga works with the body as a whole, seeing physical health as inseparable from mental health. Our goal when working with the physical body will be to address root causes of suffering such as chronic stress or unhelpful movement patterns. They often go together. Integrative yoga sessions complement and support the work of other healing modalities, including western medicine.
  • I take prescriptions or use other healing modalities. What are your feelings about that?
    I take a solutions-oriented approach to well-being that is tailored to your life and circumstances. Neither yoga nor recovery is one-size-fits-all. My work with you will always support your choices regarding other modalities, including western medicine. Part of what we do together is integrate all of the avenues of healing that you find useful.
  • What is the difference between the breathwork we do in yoga and conscious, connected breathwork?
    Pranayama is the traditional yogic term for breathing practices. Most breath instruction given in yoga classes is meant to encourage a state of "rest and digest." It is generally gentle and relaxing. Conscious, connected breathwork is a specific breathing technique that intentionally stimulates your nervous system for a limited period of time. It is hard work, and the effects are often dramatic and life-changing. If what you want to learn are breath practices that improve focus, relaxation, and awareness, or if you want to work on improving your default breathing patterns, then integrative yoga sessions are a better fit. If you are looking for a more intense experience to rapidly shift your perspective, clear blocks, or release stored emotions, then conscious, connected breathwork will be a great place to start. Most of us benefit from both.
  • How intense is the altered state of consciousness that occurs during breathwork?
    The intensity of this altered state will be perceived differently by each person and at each session. The important thing to know is that you are always in control! You have not ingested a chemical or plant substance. If you feel overwhelmed at any point, you can stop the technique and return to normal breathing, which will quickly bring you back to homeostasis.
  • Is breathwork safe?
    Breathwork is a healing modality that is safe and effective for most people. It can be intense, but it's your breath and you always get to decide how to breathe! Having said that, please read the list of contraindications listed below. The beauty of breathwork is that are always in control of your experience. Unlike when taking a chemical or plant substance, the effects of breathwork quickly pass simply by breathing normally. If you become overwhelmed for any reason, you can simply discontinue the technique and breathe slowly through your nose. The only two responses I have seen which may feel uncomfortable are an intense emotional release and a physical symptom called tetany. Tetany is muscular cramping, typically in the hands. It is not harmful, and it passes when the breath returns to normal. Intense emotional experiences will likely feel cathartic and necessary, but they may also feel overwhelming. Remember that you are 100% in charge. You simply return to your normal breath and your body will quickly return to homeostasis.
  • Are there contraindications for breathwork?
    Yes. Here are some commonly discussed contraindications for this type of breathwork. Please be aware that this list is not meant to be exhaustive. Please check with your doctor before participating if you have questions or concerns. Pregnancy Cardiovascular disease High blood pressure History of aneurisms (including family) Epilepsy or history of seizures History of psychosis Osteoporosis Recent surgery Glaucoma An active addiction Untreated mental illness
  • Are there contraindications for yoga?
    No! There are contraindications for particular poses, but not for the practice itself. We will address potential contraindications together based on your health history. Having particular health concerns that may affect your practice is a great reason to take private yoga classes. With guidance, yoga is a very safe practice that can be tailored to every body.
  • What is the difference between the breathwork we do in yoga and conscious, connected breathwork?
    Pranayama is the traditional yogic term for breathing practices. Most breath instruction given in yoga classes is meant to encourage a state of "rest and digest." It is generally gentle and relaxing. Conscious, connected breathwork is a specific breathing technique that intentionally stimulates your nervous system for a limited period of time. It is hard work, and the effects are often dramatic and life-changing. If what you want to learn are breath practices that improve focus, relaxation, and awareness, or if you want to work on improving your default breathing patterns, then integrative yoga sessions are a better fit. If you are looking for a more intense experience to rapidly shift your perspective, clear blocks, or release stored emotions, then conscious, connected breathwork will be a great place to start. Most of us benefit from both.
  • How intense is the altered state of consciousness that occurs during breathwork?
    The intensity of this altered state will be perceived differently by each person and at each session. The important thing to know is that you are always in control! You have not ingested a chemical or plant substance. If you feel overwhelmed at any point, you can stop the technique and return to normal breathing, which will quickly bring you back to homeostasis.
  • Is breathwork safe?
    Breathwork is a healing modality that is safe and effective for most people. It can be intense, but it's your breath and you always get to decide how to breathe! Having said that, please read the list of contraindications listed below. The beauty of breathwork is that are always in control of your experience. Unlike when taking a chemical or plant substance, the effects of breathwork quickly pass simply by breathing normally. If you become overwhelmed for any reason, you can simply discontinue the technique and breathe slowly through your nose. The only two responses I have seen which may feel uncomfortable are an intense emotional release and a physical symptom called tetany. Tetany is muscular cramping, typically in the hands. It is not harmful, and it passes when the breath returns to normal. Intense emotional experiences will likely feel cathartic and necessary, but they may also feel overwhelming. Remember that you are 100% in charge. You simply return to your normal breath and your body will quickly return to homeostasis.
  • Are there contraindications for breathwork?
    Yes. Here are some commonly discussed contraindications for this type of breathwork. Please be aware that this list is not meant to be exhaustive. Please check with your doctor before participating if you have questions or concerns. Pregnancy Cardiovascular disease High blood pressure History of aneurisms (including family) Epilepsy or history of seizures History of psychosis Osteoporosis Recent surgery Glaucoma An active addiction Untreated mental illness
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